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NAS Cover

 

 

Welcome
Click here to hear this greeting in Chinuk Wawa, the intertribal universal language of the Pacific Northwest

 

Audio file

 

 

 

 

What is Native American and Indigenous Studies?

Native American and Indigenous Studies is an interdisciplinary field that uses multiple approaches from history, anthropology, law, literature, ethnic studies, and other disciplines to understand Native American history, culture, politics, and contemporary lives. NAIS highlights the unique place of tribes in the state-tribal-federal intergovernmental matrix and the myriad of distinct issues Native peoples of the United States face, from language and cultural protection to environmental issues to economic development and beyond.

Why Native American and Indigenous Studies?

Students in Native American and Indigenous Studies will join a diverse, tightly knit community of scholars who cherish our connections with Native communities and strive to make our work valuable for the project of building up Native nations. Most Americans are vaguely aware of tribal governments and even fewer have thought about what limited forms of tribal sovereignty say about American democratic ideals. Through our research, classes, programming, and activism, we aim to change this. In a state with nine federally recognized indigenous nations and with a Native American population 50% higher proportionally than the national average, this knowledge is crucial for future leaders in all fields.

What Will I Learn & Where Can I Go?
UO NAIS affords students extensive grounding in Indigenous history and culture as well as nuanced understanding of tribal sovereignty, Indigenous nationhood, settler colonialism, and the diversity and beauty of contemporary Indigenous lives and experiences. Such work prepares students for a variety of postsecondary opportunities ranging from government, law, research, and education; to nonprofit and public interest work, environmental and resource management, and business and economic development; to the arts, journalism, communication, new media, and beyond.

 

 

Major Requirements

The NAIS interdisciplinary major has two tracks: a conventional track and a language track. Both tracks require a minimum of 56 credits, at least 28 of which must be taken in residence at the UO, the same core coursework and distribution requirements, and 1 year of Indigenous language instruction. The language track includes a 2nd year of Indigenous language instruction.

All courses counting toward the major must be taken for letter grades and completed with grades of C or higher. 

At least one upper-division course must be taken from Group 3: Literature, Media, and the Arts. 

 

 

 

Minor Requirements

The Native American and Indigenous Studies minor compliments numerous other fields of study and provides access to ways of knowing and living that are part of the heritage and future of this state, and this nation.  

The interdisciplinary minor requires a minimum of 28 credits, with at least 16 of those being upper-division credits. All courses counting toward the minor must be taken for letter grades and completed with grades of C or higher.

Students must fulfill distribution requirements, taking at least one class each from the following groups:

Group I: Culture, Language, and Education
Group II: Law, Policy, Governance, and History
Group III: Literature, Media, and the Arts

 

 

Native American and Indigenous Studies Advisory Council
Panel

 

Territorial Acknowledgment

The University of Oregon is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people. Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon. Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world.

In following the Indigenous protocol of acknowledging the original people of the land we occupy, we also extend our respect to the nine federally recognized Indigenous nations of Oregon: the Burns Paiute Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Coquille Indian Tribe, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, and the Klamath Tribes. We express our respect to the many more tribes who have ancestral connections to this territory, as well as to all other displaced Indigenous peoples who call Oregon home. Hayu masi.

 

NEWS

 

UO Announces a Native American and Indigenous Studies Major! 

 

 

Oct 26
Let's (Tele)Talk - LGBTQIA Students 11:00 a.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Carolyn Meiller, who specializes in working with LGBTQIA students, for Let’s Talk on Tuesdays, 11AM-1PM. Let’s Talk is a service that...
Let's (Tele)Talk - LGBTQIA Students
October 19–December 7
11:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Carolyn Meiller, who specializes in working with LGBTQIA students, for Let’s Talk on Tuesdays, 11AM-1PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Oct 26
Let's (Tele)Talk - LatinX/Undocumented Students 3:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Eric Garcia, who specializes in working with LatinX and undocumented students, for Let’s Talk on Tuesdays, 3-5PM. Let’s Talk is a service...
Let's (Tele)Talk - LatinX/Undocumented Students
October 19–December 7
3:00–5:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Eric Garcia, who specializes in working with LatinX and undocumented students, for Let’s Talk on Tuesdays, 3-5PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Oct 26
15th Annual Rennard Strickland Lecture 6:00 p.m.

The Rennard Strickland Lecture Series was established in 2006 to honor the legacy of Dean Rennard Strickland and to build on his contributions to the field of Indian law, to legal...
15th Annual Rennard Strickland Lecture
October 26
6:00 p.m.

The Rennard Strickland Lecture Series was established in 2006 to honor the legacy of Dean Rennard Strickland and to build on his contributions to the field of Indian law, to legal education, and to the Environmental and Natural Resources and Indian law programs in our law school.

The theme of the lecture series is the examination of Native leadership and vision for environmental stewardship in the 21st century. This year’s speaker will be Professor Stacey Leeds. Her talk is titled "Oil and Gas: An Oklahoma Origin Story and McGirt."

Oct 27
2021-22 Common Seeing: Meeting Points

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common...
2021-22 Common Seeing: Meeting Points
October 14–April 10

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common Seeing expands this conversation through the visual arts.

The 2021-22 selection, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer, addresses humanity’s responsibility to the natural world through its author’s observations as an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, academically trained botanist, and mother. Kimmerer calls for a reciprocal relationship between people and nature that prioritizes generosity and respects the needs of all living things. Her memoir’s interwoven topics include ecology, parenting, Indigenous land and water rights, traditional foodways, good citizenship, sustainability, climate change, and the preservation of language.

This year’s Common Seeing brings together works by nine contemporary Native artists that speak to these issues and each’s experiences as individuals and members of their communities. Featured artists include Natalie Ball (American, Black, Modoc and Klamath), Joe Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes), Bud Lane (Siletz), Joey Lavadour (Walla Walla/Métis), Brenda Mallory (Cherokee), Lillian Pitt (Warm Springs, Wasco, and Yakama), Gail Tremblay (Mi'kmaq and Onondaga), Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), and Shirod Younker (Coquille, Coos, and Umpqua, b. 1972). JSMA is especially grateful to the Museum of Natural and Cultural History for lending work from their collection. 

For more information about the UO’s Common Reading and to find out how members of the UO Community can access a digital copy of Braiding Sweetgrass, visit https://fyp.uoregon.edu/common-reading-2021-2022-braiding-sweetgrass.

 

The JSMA is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people. Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon. Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world. In following the Indigenous protocol of acknowledging the original people of the land we occupy, we also extend our respect to the nine federally recognized Indigenous nations of Oregon: the Burns Paiute Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Coquille Indian Tribe, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, and the Klamath Tribes. We express our respect to the many more tribes who have ancestral connections to this territory, as well as to all other displaced Indigenous peoples who call Oregon home.

 

Gail Tremblay (American, Mi'kmaq, and Onondaga, b. 1945), 2018. 1981 Film Irony: Trying to Have an American Film in Cheyenne Native Language Judged in the Foreign Film Category for the Oscars (Even the Academy Rejected the Proposal), 2018. 35mm film (from “Windwalker," 1981), red and white film leader, silver braid 24 x 14 x 14 in. Museum Purchase through the Edna Pearl Horton Memorial Endowment. (Image courtesy of the Artist and Froelick Gallery; photography by Mario Gallucci.)

Oct 27
Let's (Tele)Talk - Black and African American Student Support 2:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Cecile Gadson, who specializes in working with Black and African American students, for Let’s Talk on Wednesdays 2-4PM. Let’s Talk is a...
Let's (Tele)Talk - Black and African American Student Support
October 20–December 8
2:00–4:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Cecile Gadson, who specializes in working with Black and African American students, for Let’s Talk on Wednesdays 2-4PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Oct 27
Let's (Tele)Talk - Graduate Students 4:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Colleen McCarthy, who specializes in working with graduate students, for Let’s Talk on Wednesdays 4-6PM. Let’s Talk is a service that...
Let's (Tele)Talk - Graduate Students
October 20–December 8
4:00–6:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Colleen McCarthy, who specializes in working with graduate students, for Let’s Talk on Wednesdays 4-6PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Oct 28
Mental Health 101-Wellness Workshop 2:00 p.m.

Life gets hard. College isn't easy. How do we know when it is time to ask for support and who can we ask for support from? This workshop focuses on learning how to identify...
Mental Health 101-Wellness Workshop
October 28
2:00–2:50 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Duck Nest (Room 041)

Life gets hard. College isn't easy. How do we know when it is time to ask for support and who can we ask for support from? This workshop focuses on learning how to identify when our feelings, thoughts and actions don't align with our truths. Knowing this we can learn when it is time to ask for help. We will also discuss how to ask for support within our social circle, college, and community.

Oct 28
Shifting the Narrative: A Conversation on Race and Identity in Children’s Books 3:00 p.m.

University of Oregon’s Special Collections and University Archives, in partnership with Eugene Public Library, will present a virtual panel discussion, cosponsored by the...
Shifting the Narrative: A Conversation on Race and Identity in Children’s Books
October 28
3:00 p.m.

University of Oregon’s Special Collections and University Archives, in partnership with Eugene Public Library, will present a virtual panel discussion, cosponsored by the OHC’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences and Humanities, which will address the complex issues of race and identity in children’s literature—specifically, who can tell whose story, how do we deal with our racist past, and how we can begin to bring fresh narratives and perspectives to the field.   

Panel participants include moderator Elizabeth Wheeler, University of Oregon Associate Professor of English; Kimberly Johnson, University of Oregon Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and author of juvenile literature; Debbie Reese (Nambé Pueblo), founder, American Indians in Children’s Literature; and Chenoa (Lummi and S’Klallam) and Keith (Lummi) Egawa, authors and illustrators of children’s literature. 

Organizer Danielle Mericle, SCUA’s Curator of Visual Resources, says “I am really pleased to facilitate this conversation with contemporary children’s literature authors and scholars about the significance of race and identity in the genre. These creators and critics are leading forces in moving young adult and children’s literature into anti-racism and reframing our understandings of racism in children’s literature history.”

Oct 28
Let's (Tele)Talk - Thursday 4-6PM 4:00 p.m.

Meet with a Counseling Services staff member for Let’s Talk on Thursdays 4-6PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential...
Let's (Tele)Talk - Thursday 4-6PM
October 14–December 9
4:00–6:00 p.m.

Meet with a Counseling Services staff member for Let’s Talk on Thursdays 4-6PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis.

Oct 29
Let's (Tele)Talk - Friday 1-3PM 1:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Mariko Lin for Let’s Talk on Fridays 1-3PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential...
Let's (Tele)Talk - Friday 1-3PM
October 15–December 10
1:00–3:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Mariko Lin for Let’s Talk on Fridays 1-3PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Nov 1
Let's (Tele)Talk - International Students 2:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Jingqing Liu, who specializes in working with international students, for Let’s Talk on Mondays, 2-4PM. Let’s Talk is a service that...
Let's (Tele)Talk - International Students
October 18–December 6
2:00–4:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Jingqing Liu, who specializes in working with international students, for Let’s Talk on Mondays, 2-4PM. Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will be offered via Zoom. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s (Tele)Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Nov 3
IDEAS ON TAP: Demystifying Thanksgiving 6:00 p.m.

The story of the Mayflower landing is part of the founding mythology of the USA and has been taught as the "birthplace of a country" since the 19th century. However,...
IDEAS ON TAP: Demystifying Thanksgiving
November 3
6:00 p.m.

The story of the Mayflower landing is part of the founding mythology of the USA and has been taught as the "birthplace of a country" since the 19th century. However, that story provides only one perspective on the history of colonization. Join Chris Newell, Passamaquoddy author and director of education at the Akomawt Educational Initiative, for a more balanced retelling of the 1621 landing, the Plimoth Thanksgiving, and their aftermath. If You Lived During Plimoth Thanksgiving (hyperlink: https://kids.scholastic.com/kids/book/if-you-lived-during-the-plimouth-than…) will be released on November 2, 2021.

Register to participate on Zoom:  https://uoregon.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tOVmdWwhQXyIj5S672Q0Bg?fbclid=I… or watch the talk live on our Facebook page. 

Nov 4
Air, Water Land: Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism 9:00 a.m.

Air, Water Land: Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism  Climate change, environmental racism, settler colonialism, white supremacy,...
Air, Water Land: Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism
November 4
9:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

Air, Water Land: Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism 

Climate change, environmental racism, settler colonialism, white supremacy, patriarchy, north/south divides, and unequal access to basic environmental resources by communities of color have inspired ongoing environmental justice activism in the Americas. This Fall 2021 symposium will center Indigenous and Black voices, leverage the campus residencies of Maya activist and teacher Irma Alicia Velasquez Nimatuj (in residence through the Global Justice Initiative and the Department of Anthropology) and Muskogee/Creek artist and activist Amber Starks (in residence through the UO Common Reading program) and focus on environmental justice and sustainable food systems. Designed to foster critical conversations from Indigenous and Black/Afro-descendant communities across the Americas, this event is organized around themes of air, land, and water, with a committed focus to issues impacting local communities. 

This symposium will feature three remote panels that explore these connections through air, land, and water, a keynote conversation, and a final discussion and demonstration of sustainable food systems. The event is organized by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), Native American and Indigenous Studies, Anthropology, Black Studies, the Global Justice Initiative, and the Common Reading program of the University of Oregon.  

A full program can be found here https://cllas.uoregon.edu/fall-2021-symposium/

These events are generously supported by the Office of the President, the Center for Environmental Futures, the Just Futures Institute, the Barbara and Carlisle Moore Chair in English, Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Black Studies, the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), Native American and Indigenous Studies, the Many Nations Longhouse, the Julie and Rocky Dixon Chair of U.S. Western History, the Department of Environmental Studies, and the Department of English.

Remote events will be held over Zoom. Subscribe to CLLAS emails to receive event & Zoom details by emailing cllas@uoregon.edu or at https://mailchi.mp/6cca8cf9e3c8/cllas-email-subscribers

In-person events are subject to UO COVID guidelines and may change; they are restricted to UO community and guests. Please register for in-person events by emailing cllas@uoregon.edu.

Updates to in-person events as well as additional information on symposium participants can be found at https://cllas.uoregon.edu/fall-2021-symposium/

Symposium panels will be livestreamed at https://www.facebook.com/uocllas

The Centerpiece Conversation between Irma Alicia and Amber will be livestreamed at  https://youtu.be/Qe9ZLBj_jNA

The University of Oregon is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people. Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon. Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world.

Nov 4
Creating Healthy Habits-Wellness Workshop 2:00 p.m.

Do you feel like you're stuck in a rut? Or that your typical routine is not working? Are you interested in creating healthy habits? Join us in this workshop where we will...
Creating Healthy Habits-Wellness Workshop
November 4
2:00–2:50 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Duck Nest (Room 041)

Do you feel like you're stuck in a rut? Or that your typical routine is not working? Are you interested in creating healthy habits? Join us in this workshop where we will discuss how to form healthy habits that will benefit you both in-and-out of school.

Nov 5
Free First Friday at the Museum 10:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. Investigate Oregon's amazing fossils and ecosystems, and delve into its...
Free First Friday at the Museum
November 5–December 3
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. Investigate Oregon's amazing fossils and ecosystems, and delve into its cultural history—from the First Americans at Paisley Caves to the dynamic cultures of today's Tribes. 

Nov 11
Holiday Closure - Veterans Day

The museum will reopen open on Friday, November 12

Holiday Closure - Veterans Day
November 11
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The museum will reopen open on Friday, November 12

Nov 13
Redefining Outdoorsy: BIPOC Hike and Hot Springs Trip 9:00 a.m.

The University of Oregon Outdoor Program is kicking off our 2021-2022 Redefining Outdoorsy Project! Throughout the year we will be hosting a series of fully funded affinity trips,...
Redefining Outdoorsy: BIPOC Hike and Hot Springs Trip
November 13
9:00 a.m.
Outdoor Program (OP) Barn

The University of Oregon Outdoor Program is kicking off our 2021-2022 Redefining Outdoorsy Project! Throughout the year we will be hosting a series of fully funded affinity trips, to provide a safe and comfortable environment for people to get outside with people who share similar identities! Our second trip will be for BIPOC students! In Partnership with the Multicultural Center we will be headed to Tamolitch (Blue Pool), an iconic yet accesible hike along highway 126 with beautiful views! Meet other BIPOC students, and enjoy the day being outside with awesome folks!

Sign up by calling our Rental Barn at (541)-346-4371.

Transportation, rain gear, jackets, and hotspring access will be provided for free, this trip is FREE for BIPOC students!

 

Nov 17
Little Wonders Museum Fun for Preschoolers

Available on our website beginning November 19 Kits available for pickup starting Wednesday, November 17   Learn and play from home—museum...
Little Wonders Museum Fun for Preschoolers
November 17

Available on our website beginning November 19

Kits available for pickup starting Wednesday, November 17

 

Learn and play from home—museum style! Preschoolers and their adults can join us online for our popular Little Wonders program, featuring stories, hands-on activities, and more. This month is all about things with wings! From birds to bugs to bats, discover flying animals living all around us. 

 

Head to Little Wonders Online beginning Friday, November 19 and join the fun!  

 

Want a little help gathering the materials? We now have Little Wonders activity kits, available for pick-up at the museum starting Wednesday, November 17. Kits are $5 each; MNCH members are entitled to two free kits each month; discounted kits are available to Oregon Trail or other EBT card holders. Supplies are limited and kits are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Pick up your kit Wednesday through Sunday 10:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m, and until 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays.* You can also request to have your kits mailed to you. Complete the request form at https://mnch.uoregon.edu/form/little-wonders-activity-kit-request.  

 

*Open hours are subject to change. Before you pick up your kit at the museum, please call 541-346-3024 or visit our website for the most current information: mnch.uoregon.edu/visit

Nov 18
Thanks But No Thanks-giving: Decolonizing an American Holiday 2:00 p.m.

Millions of families gather together every year to celebrate Thanksgiving in the United States. Many Americans do not grow up thinking much of the history behind the holiday. The...
Thanks But No Thanks-giving: Decolonizing an American Holiday
November 18
2:00–2:50 p.m.

Millions of families gather together every year to celebrate Thanksgiving in the United States. Many Americans do not grow up thinking much of the history behind the holiday. The main messages are that of gratitude, food, and family; however, Thanksgiving is, foundationally speaking, a celebration of the ongoing genocide against native peoples and cultures across the globe. In collaboration with NASU (Native American Student Union), we will focus on ways in which we can continue to show gratitude while raising our critical consciousness and identifying ways to decolonize the holiday. This workshop is free and open to UO students, faculty, and staff. Click on the zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/92589611616

Nov 23
BE Rezilient with Tracie Jackson 5:30 p.m.

Tracie Jackson studied design at UO and is an Indigenous designer focused on the intersectionality between culture, sport, and design. Tracie is focused on creating authentic...
BE Rezilient with Tracie Jackson
November 23
5:30–7:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Ballroom

Tracie Jackson studied design at UO and is an Indigenous designer focused on the intersectionality between culture, sport, and design. Tracie is focused on creating authentic representation for BIPOC in the sportswear industry.

Tracie Jackson is a Diné Indigenous artist and designer. Growing up on and off the Navajo Reservation in Northern Arizona she was raised by an artisan family full of weavers and silversmiths making her a fourth generation Diné artist. At age 14 she saw her future in the N7 logo she had seen at a Native basketball tournament. She had never seen Native representation in the sports world like it so she made it her goal to be N7's designer.

In 2018 she achieved her dream job of working for Nike N7. Starting out as a graphic designer for footwear and apparel she is now a Footwear Designer leading the N7 design team at Nike World Headquarters. In 2019 Tracie led the creative direction for the N7's Holiday Collection collaboration with Pendleton Woolen Mills. The collaboration featured footwear, clothing, and a custom designed Pendleton blanket with proceeds going back to the N7 Fund and the American Indian College Fund. On top of leading the creative side Tracie was also featured in the collections campaign highlighting Indigenous women who are 'Modern Matriarchs'. That same Fall Tracie and a few other Native women on the campaign were invited to lead a panel discussion at the Teen Vogue Summit explaining the meaning of being a 'Modern Matriarch'.

Outside of her Nike work Tracie creates handmade jewelry and art collections influenced by her perspective of Native arts meeting sport culture. In 2020 for the MTV VMAs Taboo from the music group Black Eyed Peas reached out to Tracie for custom made beadwork for his appearance and performance. Tracie created a beaded medallion Necklace made out of sterling silver, turquoise, and design motifs personal to Taboo and his Indigenous culture.

In 2021 she started her art shop called Rezilient Soles focused on the intersectionality between sportwear and Indigenous culture. The artwork ranging from overt Indigenous designs to Indigenous craftsmanship done with a sports twist. Representation matters and she's using art and design to create space for Indigenous peoples in sport.

Instagram: @rezilient.soles

BE Rezilient is organized by The BE Series

The BE Series (@uobeseries) brings together thinkers, makers, disrupters in every field to share their ideas on issues that really matter.

Doors: 5:30pm

Presentation: 6:00-7:30pm

Nov 25
Holiday Closure

The museum will reopen open on Friday, November 26

Holiday Closure
November 25

The museum will reopen open on Friday, November 26

Nov 27
SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY at the Museum Store 10:00 a.m.

This holiday season, shop local and make a difference!  Your purchase at the museum store directly supports education programs that inspire Oregonians all across the...
SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY at the Museum Store
November 27
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

This holiday season, shop local and make a difference!  Your purchase at the museum store directly supports education programs that inspire Oregonians all across the state. Join us on Small Business Saturday and browse our unique collection of gifts created by Northwest artists and authors. Admission to the store is always free. 

Dec 2
Mindfulness-Wellness Workshop 2:00 p.m.

How do we stay in the present moment when the future is always looming and the past is catching up to us? This workshop will center around what it means to be present by diving...
Mindfulness-Wellness Workshop
December 2
2:00–2:50 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Duck Nest (Room 041)

How do we stay in the present moment when the future is always looming and the past is catching up to us? This workshop will center around what it means to be present by diving into the research and application of mindfulness techniques for the busy college student.

Jan 7
Free First Friday at the Museum 10:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. Investigate Oregon's amazing fossils and ecosystems, and delve into its...
Free First Friday at the Museum
January 7
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. Investigate Oregon's amazing fossils and ecosystems, and delve into its cultural history—from the First Americans at Paisley Caves to the dynamic cultures of today's Tribes.

Jan 22
RO Indigenous Student Affinity Trip (TRIP IS FULL!) 8:00 a.m.

The University of Oregon Outdoor Program is kicking off our 2021-2022 Redefining Outdoorsy Project. Throughout the year we will be hosting a series of fully funded affinity trips,...
RO Indigenous Student Affinity Trip (TRIP IS FULL!)
January 22
8:00 a.m.
Outdoor Program (OP) Barn

The University of Oregon Outdoor Program is kicking off our 2021-2022 Redefining Outdoorsy Project. Throughout the year we will be hosting a series of fully funded affinity trips, to provide a safe and comfortable environment for people to get outside with people who share similar identities!

We're kicking off winter term with an Indigenous student affinity trip! In partnership with the Native American Student Union we will be taking a group of students to Amanda Trail on the coast to hike with other students, while also learning a little bit more about the history of the area!

Date: January 22nd, 2022

Time: 8am

Location: Rental Barn (1225 E. 18th Ave.)

Pre-trip on January 19th at 5pm in the Erb Memorial Union Outdoor Program. Required to attend this outing!

Level: Beginner, no experience needed. Call the Rental Barn if you have any questions! (541-346-4371) Sign-up here: https://forms.gle/sPJGmMjNAvnoqxxJ8 

 

Jan 24
'Braiding Sweetgrass' Author Talk with Robin Wall Kimmerer noon

Join Common Reading and author Robin Wall Kimmerer as she gives a virtual talk on the 2021/22 AY selection, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific...
'Braiding Sweetgrass' Author Talk with Robin Wall Kimmerer
January 24
noon
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) 156 Ballroom

Join Common Reading and author Robin Wall Kimmerer as she gives a virtual talk on the 2021/22 AY selection, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.

RSVP to the in-person event, which will be a livestream of the talk in the EMU ballroom: https://ticket.uoregon.edu/uo/rwk-live. Open to UO affiliated students, staff, and faculty and to Native and/or Indigenous members of the public. 

RSVP to livestream the event from a different location: https://ticket.uoregon.edu/uo/rwk-stream. Open to anyone. 

 

Jan 25
Non-Eurocentric Approaches to Self-Love - Discussion Series 4:00 p.m.

Join our discussion series for students interested in sharing or learning about what self-care looks like in various non-Western cultures. Specifically, we will talk about the...
Non-Eurocentric Approaches to Self-Love - Discussion Series
January 25–February 8
4:00–5:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Mills International Center, Erb Memorial Union Mezzanine 102

Join our discussion series for students interested in sharing or learning about what self-care looks like in various non-Western cultures. Specifically, we will talk about the non-Eurocentric views of well-being, the body, food, social connections, and support seeking. Through the discussions, we hope to facilitate holistic self-care and healing, raise critical consciousness of the impact of Eurocentric values/worldview on our health, and empower individuals with a non-Eurocentric culture of origin by helping them reconnect to their cultural roots.

Topics by date:

Tuesday, January 25 - Holistic Well-being Tuesday, February 1 - Nurturing Relationship with Body and Food Tuesday, February 8 - Social Support and Help-Seeking in Holistic Cultures

Feb 4
Free First Friday at the Museum 10:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. Investigate Oregon's amazing fossils and ecosystems, and delve into its...
Free First Friday at the Museum
February 4–April 1
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission on the first Friday of the month. Investigate Oregon's amazing fossils and ecosystems, and delve into its cultural history—from the First Americans at Paisley Caves to the dynamic cultures of today's Tribes.

Feb 7
BIPOC Leadership Workshop: The Influence of Culture in the Workplace 3:00 p.m.

“Leadership” is considered one of the core career readiness competencies for college students that lead to success in the workplace and lifelong career management. The...
BIPOC Leadership Workshop: The Influence of Culture in the Workplace
February 7
3:00–4:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Multicultural Center, room 109

“Leadership” is considered one of the core career readiness competencies for college students that lead to success in the workplace and lifelong career management. The truth of the matter is that leadership, as defined in the U.S., is not built for the success and retention of BIPOC individuals. BIPOC communities and cultures value collective thoughts and collaboration over individualism; connection, growth and community over professionalism; excellence over perfectionism; and storytelling and verbal communication over the written word. It’s time to change the narrative and bring BIPOC leadership into the spotlight!

In this interactive workshop facilitated by BIPOC Student Leaders from Holden Center for Leadership and Community Engagement, we invite you to reflect on leadership, culture, and identity as we examine the influence of culture in the workplace. UO Alumni Leo Pichette Director Nike University Relations and enrolled member of Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and Career Lead for Native American Network at Nike, will also join to share his experience and insights on leadership and culture in the workplace.  We hope this will be a space for collective learning and you will walk away with a better understanding of how you can leverage your unique culture and identities to demonstrate BIPOC leadership skills for a better future.

 

Special thanks to the U.S. Department of State for sponsoring this workshop series.

Presented by: University Career Center & Holden Center for Leadership and Community Engagement

Feb 15
Between Every Two Pines: The Settler Colonial Politics of Recreation noon

Native Studies Colloquium Please join Sarah Stach, UO political science, for a discussion of her dissertation research.   Abstract: Between Every Two Pines:...
Between Every Two Pines: The Settler Colonial Politics of Recreation
February 15
noon
This is a virtual event.

Native Studies Colloquium

Please join Sarah Stach, UO political science, for a discussion of her dissertation research.

 

Abstract:

Between Every Two Pines: The Settler Colonial Politics of Recreation examines the relationship between settler colonial and capitalist logics in the United States, specifically in national parks as a political institution. This project engages two main inquiries: first, it describes the significance of Indigenous dispossession as a central animating force for the development of capitalist relations in the 19th and 20th centuries. Second, it analyzes U.S. national parks in the context of progressive era state-building projects in a genealogical critique of American political development. The dissertation argues that settler colonial and capitalist logics were fundamental to park-building practices, which have shaped a settler colonial politics of recreation. Ultimately, this research shows how U.S. national parks function to reproduce both Indigenous dispossession and racial capitalism.

 

Sarah Stach is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at the University of Oregon. Her research focuses on the intersection of settler colonialism and capitalism with a specific interest in Indigenous-settler relations in the context of public land.